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Religious Studies Department, SCU
Style Sheet
 
 
 
 

 

 

The purpose of this guide is to provide formatting directions for the papers you will write in your course. This guide also includes video tutorials for the three most common word processing applications—Microsoft Word, Apple’s Pages, and Google Docs—so that you can learn how to use them to do much of this formatting work.

The guide is divided into three main parts:

paper format citation templates

Click here for a citation infographic that lays out the principles of citation.

 

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Paper Format

This section of the guide specifies the margins, type-face, pagination, and heading requirements for papers.

Margins
Set your left and right margins at 1.25 inches and your top and bottom margins at 1 inch.
 

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Type-Face
Use Times or Times New Roman 12 pt type for your papers.
 

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Pagination
Add page numbers in the top right, bottom right, or bottom center of your pages. No name, paper title, or punctuation is needed with the page number in the header or footer.

 

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Separate Title Page
Set your left and right margins at 1.25 inches and your top and bottom margins at 1 inch.
 

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Heading
Every paper should have a heading on the first page (this is not a header, which lies above the 1-inch top margin, but a heading, starting at the top of the text box on the page).

The heading should have your name on the first line, the course number and name on the second line, the name of the assignment on the third line, and the date of submission on the fourth line. The heading should be single-spaced, even if the rest of the paper is double-spaced.

Set the Title of your paper (centered) or, if there is no title, the first line of your paper, two lines below the bottom of your heading.

 

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Citation

When you integrate the ideas or words of another person in your paper, it is important to cite them properly. This is a necessary academic discipline—one that requires you to attend carefully to your sources, to acknowledge your dependence on them in your education, and to guide your reader to them if they would like to check or read more deeply. In this way, proper citation is a practice of both humility and hospitality, which are important academic virtues. Of course, proper citation also models academic integrity, which is an expectation of all students at Santa Clara University.

There are two primary citation systems used in the academy—the “citation-sequence” or “notes-bibliography” system used in the humanities, and the “author-date” system used in the social sciences and sciences.

This style manual follows the citation-sequence or notes-bibliography system. Each note corresponds to a unique raised number placed at the end of the sentence in which the cited phrase or idea occurs, after the closing period.

All word processing programs have an insert menu that allows you to insert footnotes or references: place the cursor after the period, insert the note or reference, and type your citation. The program inserts the raised number for you, opens a corresponding note at the bottom of page (or end of document), and automatically keeps the numbers in sequence.
 

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In the citation-sequence or notes-bibliography system, you also include a final separate page for your bibliography. This page lists everything you read for the paper, even if you did not cite all the sources in your footnotes (in this way, it differs from the Works Cited page used in the author-date system, which only cites sources parenthetically noted in the body of the paper).
 
The bibliography is single-spaced and organized alphabetically by author’s last name. To help isolate those last names, a hanging indent is used to “hang” all lines but the first in ½-inch from the left margin. Word processors make both alphabetization and hanging indents easy.
 

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For both your footnotes and bibliography, you still need to know what information to put in the notes, in what order and with what punctuation. The examples below differ somewhat on elements and punctuation, depending on what type of source you are citing: for example, a book is cited one way, while there are slightly different elements in the citation of a journal article or essay in an edited volume. In addition, in footnotes, you will cite your source fully the first time, but subsequent citations can be shortened. Therefore, for each example below, we provide the two forms for footnotes (initial complete citation, subsequent shortened note), and then the citation you would use in your bibliography.

Another important point is that notes only reference the page on which the citation or idea is found, while the full page range of the article or chapter is cited only in the bibliography.

Note that the footnotes are customarily formatted in 10-pt type, while the bibliography, like the body of the paper, is formatted in 12-pt type. Our examples below are based on The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th ed.

General Format

Notes (text is 10pt)

Note

Bibliography (text is 12pt)

Bibliography

Shortcuts

Print Bible (NRSV)
Book Work of Art
Online Bible (NRSV) eBook Illumination
Online Bible (NABRE) Dissertation Music downloaded from Commercial Vendor
Qurʾan Chapter or Essay in an Edited Book Audio File downloaded online
Papal Encyclical Chapter in a Book by a Single Author Audio Recording (not downloaded)
Conciliar Document/ Church Teaching Film/Motion Picture Musical Composition (sheet music)
Journal Article Online Video
Class Lecture
Online Source Interview Class Web site

Print Bible (NRSV)

Note

2 Bruce M. Metzger et al., eds., The Holy Bible (NRSV) (Washington, D.C.: National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA, 1989).

Shortened Note

You never need to cite the Bible after the first time you cite it fully, because your parenthetical (Book ch:vs) references in the body of the paper are enough to guide the reader to the location of your citation, and in your first footnote you’ve provided the reader with the version you’re using.

Bibliography

Metzger, Bruce M. et al., eds. The Holy Bible (NRSV). Washington, D.C.: National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA, 1989.

Online Bible (NRSV)

Note

3 Bruce M. Metzger et al., eds., The Holy Bible (NRSV) (Washington, D.C.: National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA, 1989), online, http://biblia.com/books/nrsv/[rest of url of your specific citation, indicating book ch:vs], accessed [your access date]

Shortened Note

You never need to cite the Bible after the first time you cite it fully, because your parenthetical (Book ch:vs) references in the body of the paper are enough to guide the reader to the location of your citation.

Bibliography

Metzger, Bruce M. et al., eds. The Holy Bible (NRSV). Washington, D.C.: National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA, 1989. Online, http://biblia.com/ books/nrsv/[rest of url of your specific citation, indicating book ch:vs], accessed [your access date].

Online Bible (NABRE)

Note

4 United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, New American Bible, Revised Edition (NABRE) (Washington, D.C.: Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970), online, http://www.usccb.org/bible/[rest of url of your specific citation, indicating book ch:vs], accessed [your access date].

Shortened Note

You never need to cite the Bible after the first time you cite it fully, because your parenthetical (Book ch:vs) references in the body of the paper are enough to guide the reader to the location of your citation.

Bibliography

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. New American Bible, Revised Edition (NABRE). Washington, D.C.: Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970. Online, www.usccb.org/bible/[rest of url of your specific citation, indicating book ch:vs], accessed [your access date].

Qurʾān

Note

5 ʿAbdullah Yūsuf ʾAli, The Meaning of the Holy Qurʾān (9th ed.; Beltsville, Maryland: Amana, 1989), online, http://www.islam101.com/quran/yusufAli/[rest of url of your specific citation, indicating surah and ayat], accessed [your access date].

Shortened Note

You never need to cite the Qurʾān after the first time you cite it fully, because your parenthetical (surah:aya[t]) references in the body of the paper are enough to guide the reader to the location of your citation.

Bibliography

ʿAli, ʿAbdullah Yūsuf. The Meaning of the Holy Qurʾān, 9th ed. Beltsville, Maryland: Amana, 1989. Online, http://www.islam101.com/quran/
yusufAli/[rest of url of your specific citation, indicating surah and ayat], accessed [your access date].

Papal Encyclical

Note

6 Francis I, Evangelii Gaudium [The Joy of the Gospel], Vatican website (24 November 2013), sec., para., or line #, online, https://w2.vatican.va/content/francesco/en/apost_exhortations/
documents/papa-francesco_esortazione-ap_20131124_evangelii-gaudium.html, accessed [date you accessed website].

Shortened Note

7 Evangelii Gaudium, sec., para., or line#.

Bibliography

Francis I. Evangelii Gaudium [The Joy of the Gospel]. Vatican website (24 November 2013) sec., para., or line #. Online, https://w2.vatican.va/content/francesco/en/ apost_exhortations/documents/papa-francesco_esortazione-ap_20131124_ evangelii-gaudium.html, accessed [date you accessed website].

n.b. When citing a url, pull as much as you can up to fill out each line by placing your cursor after a back- slash and clicking shift + return to create a line break (line breaks won’t disrupt your hanging indent).

Conciliar Document/Church Teaching

Note

8 Second Vatican Council, Dei Verbum [Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation], Vatican website (18 November 1965) sec. #, online, http://www.vatican.va/archive/hist_councils/
ii_vatican_council/ documents/vat-ii_const_19651118_dei-verbum_en.html, accessed [date you accessed website].

Shortened Note

9 Dei Verbum, sec. #.

Bibliography

Second Vatican Council. Dei Verbum [Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation]. Vatican website (18 November 1965) sec. #. Online, http://www.vatican.va/archive/hist_councils/ii_vatican_council/
documents/vat-ii_const_19651118_dei-verbum_en.html, accessed [date you accessed website].

Book

Note

10 Eugene R. Schlesinger, Missa Est! A Missional Liturgical Ecclesiology (Emerging Scholars; Minneapolis: Fortress, 2017) 146.

Shortened Note

11 Schlesinger, Missa Est!, 34.

Bibliography

Schlesinger, Eugene R. Missa Est! A Missional Liturgical Ecclesiology, Emerging Scholars. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2017.

eBook

Note

12 Warren Carter and Amy-Jill Levine, The New Testament: Methods and Meanings (Abingdon, 2013-11-19) Kindle Locations 1122-1123.

Shortened Note

13 Carter and Levine, The New Testament, Kindle Location 1124.

Bibliography

Dissertation

Note

14 Roberto Mata, “Empire and Ekklēsia: Mapping the Function of Ekklēsia Rhetoric in The Book of Revelation” (Th.D. dissertation, Harvard University, 2015) 43.

Shortened Note

15 Mata, “Empire and Ekklēsia,” 96.

Bibliography

Mata, Roberto. “Empire and Ekklēsia: Mapping the Function of Ekklēsia Rhetoric in The Book of Revelation.” Th.D. dissertation, Harvard University, 2015.

Chapter or Essay in an Edited Book
Editors may appear before the parentheses, separated from the title by a comma

Note

16 Frederick J. Parrella, “Tillich and Contemporary Spirituality,” in Paul Tillich: A New Catholic Assessment (ed. Raymond F. Bulman and Frederick J. Parrella; Collegeville, Minnesota: Liturgical Press, 1994) 256.

Shortened Note

17 Parrella, “Tillich and Contemporary Spirituality,” 253.

Bibliography

Parrella, Frederick J. “Tillich and Contemporary Spirituality.” In Paul Tillich: A New Catholic Assessment (ed. Raymond F. Bulman and Frederick J. Parrella; Collegeville, Minnesota: Liturgical Press, 1994) 241-267.

Chapter in a Book by a Single Author

Note

18 Maxine Lavon Montgomery, “Toni Morrison, Sula,” in The Apocalypse in African-American Fiction (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1996) 74-6.

Shortened Note

19 Montgomery, “Toni Morrison, Sula,” 85.

Bibliography

Montgomery, Maxine Lavon. “Toni Morrison, Sula.” In The Apocalypse in African-American Fiction (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1996) 15-27.

Journal Article

Note

20 Sharon L. McMillan, “Serving at Table: Symbols and Texts in the Ordination of Deacons,” Liturgical Ministry 13 (2004) 34.

Shortened Note

21 McMillan, “Serving at Table,” 36.

Bibliography

McMillan, Sharon L. “Serving at Table: Symbols and Texts in the Ordination of Deacons.” Liturgical Ministry 13 (2004) 32-38.

Online Source

Note

22 Susan Sachs, “Egypt Makes It Easier for Women to Divorce Husbands,” The New York Times International (28 January 2000), online, http://www.nytimes.com/library/world/mideast/0128egypt-divorce.html, accessed [your access date; remove brackets once supplied].

Shortened Note

23 Sachs, “Egypt Makes It Easier for Women to Divorce Husbands.”

Bibliography

Sachs, Susan. “Egypt Makes It Easier for Women to Divorce Husbands.” The New York Times International (28 January 2000). Online, http://www.nytimes.com/library/ world/mideast/0128egypt-divorce.html, accessed [your access date; remove brackets once supplied].

Film/Motion Picture

Note

24 The Passion of the Christ, prod. Mel Gibson, Bruce Davey and Stephen McEveety, dir. Mel Gibson, 126 min., Icon Productions, 2004, DVD.

Shortened Note

25 The Passion of the Christ, 1.04.

Bibliography

The Passion of the Christ. Produced by Mel Gibson, Bruce Davey and Stephen McEveety; directed by Mel Gibson. 126 min. Icon Productions, 2004. DVD.

Online Video

Note

26 Sam Harris, Can We Build AI without Losing Control Over It? (TED Talk, 2016), online video, https://www.ted.com/talks/sam_harris_can_we_build_ai_without_losing_control_over_it, 14:27 minutes.

Shortened Note

27 Harris, Can We Build AI, 10:15

Bibliography

Harris, Sam. Can We Build AI without Losing Control Over It? TED Talk, 2016. Online video, https://www.ted.com/talks/sam_harris_can_we_build_ai_without_ losing_control_over_it, 14:27 minutes.

Interview

Note

28 Esmerelda Ortiz, Director of Sacred Heart Community Services, Interview by author, 18 February 2000, San José.

Shortened Note

29 Ortiz interview.

Bibliography

Ortiz, Esmerelda, Director of Sacred Heart Community Services. Interview by author, 18 February 2000, San José.

Work of Art

Note

30 Michelangelo Buonaroti, Moses, 1513–1515, marble, 92.5 inches, San Pietro in Vincoli, Rome.

Shortened Note

31 Michelangelo, Moses.

Bibliography

Michelangelo Buonaroti. Moses. 1513–1515. Marble. 92.5 inches. San Pietro in Vincoli, Rome.

Illumination

Note

32 Donald Jackson, Creation, 2003, ink on parchment, The Saint John’s Bible, Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota; reproduced in facsimile in The Heritage Edition, Santa Clara University Archives, Santa Clara, California.

Shortened Note

33 Jackson, Creation.

Bibliography

Jackson, Donald. Creation. 2003. Ink on parchment. The Saint John’s Bible. Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota. Reproduced in facsimile in The Heritage Edition. Santa Clara University Archives, Santa Clara, California.

Music File downloaded as an MP3 from a Commercial Vendor (e.g., iTunes)

Note

34 Five for Fighting, “100 Years,” The Battle for Everything, Columbia/Aware, 2004, MP3 file, downloaded 5 October 2015, iTunes.

Shortened Note

35 Five for Fighting, “100 Years.”

Bibliography

Five for Fighting. “100 Years.” The Battle for Everything. Columbia/Aware. 2004. MP3 file. Downloaded 5 October 2015. iTunes.

Audio File downloaded online

Note

36 Billy Graham, Evangelism and the Intellectual, Part 1, American Sermon Recordings, 1 April 1962; 24 min., 19 sec; from SermonIndex.net, Revival Sermons at SermonIndex.net; MPEG, http://www.sermonindex.net/ modules/mydownloads/viewcat.php?cid=118 (accessed 1 June 2007).

Shortened Note

37 Graham, Evangelism and the Intellectual.

Bibliography

Graham, Billy. Evangelism and the Intellectual, Part 1. American Sermon Recordings, 1 April 1962; 24 min., 19 sec. From SermonIndex.net, Revival Sermons at SermonIndex.net. MPEG, http://www.sermonindex.net/modules/mydownloads/ viewcat.php?cid=118, accessed 1 June 2007.

Musical Recording (not downloaded)

Note

38 Billie Holliday, vocal performance of “I’m a Fool to Want You,” by Joel Herron, Frank Sinatra, and Jack Wolf, recorded February 20, 1958, with Ray Ellis, on Lady in Satin, Columbia CL 1157, 33 1⁄3 rpm.

Shortened Note

39 Holiday, vocal performance of “I’m a Fool to Want You.”

Bibliography

Holliday, Billie. Vocal performance of “I’m a Fool to Want You,” by Joel Herron, Frank Sinatra, and Jack Wolf. Recorded February 20, 1958, with Ray Ellis, on Lady in Satin (Columbia CL 1157, 33 1⁄3 rpm).

Musical Composition (sheet music)

Note

40 Ricky Manalo, “Worthy Is the Lamb,” in Beyond the Days: Liturgical Music for Lent, Triduum, and Easter (Portland, Oregon: Oregon Catholic Press, 1998).

Shortened Note

41 Manalo, “Worthy Is the Lamb.”

Bibliography

Manalo, Ricky. “Worthy Is the Lamb.” In Beyond the Days: Liturgical Music for Lent, Triduum, and Easter (Portland, Oregon: Oregon Catholic Press, 1998).

Class Lecture

Note

42 Catherine M. Murphy, “Gospel of Mark,” Course lecture for PMIN 206, The Synoptic Gospels, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, California, 17 April 2018.

Shortened Note

43 Murphy, “Gospel of Mark.”

Bibliography

Murphy, Catherine M. “Gospel of Mark.” Course lecture for PMIN 206, The Synoptic Gospels. Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, California. 17 April 2018.

Class Web site

Note

44 Catherine Murphy, “The Documentary Hypothesis: The Yahwist Source,” SCTR 15 Texting God, Santa Clara University (2017), online, https://webpages.scu.edu/ftp/cmurphy/courses/sctr015/prep/ exercises/yahwist.htm, accessed [your access date; remove brackets once supplied].

Shortened Note

45 Murphy, “The Documentary Hypothesis: The Yahwist Source.”

Bibliography

Murphy, Catherine. “The Documentary Hypothesis: The Yahwist Source.” SCTR 15 Texting God, Santa Clara University (2017). Online, https://webpages.scu.edu/ ftp/cmurphy/courses/sctr015/prep/exercises/yahwist.htm, accessed [your access date; remove brackets once supplied].

 

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Templates

We provide three templates for each of the three major word-processing programs, one for a single-spaced paper, one for a double-spaced paper, and one for a research paper with a separate, unpaginated title page and a final bibliography page. These templates have the correct margins, type-face, pagination, and footnote settings built in.

To download a template, choose the type of paper you need and click on the link next to it that corresponds to your word processor. This will trigger a download of the template to your “Downloads” folder on your desktop, so look there for the template.

Single-spaced paper

Word Pages GDocs
Double-spaced paper

Word Pages GDocs
Double-spaced paper with unpaginated title page and bibliography page



Word Pages GDocs
 
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