Adrianna Oster Gozza

Adrianna Oster Gozza

Oster Wine Cellars (Winemaker)

Adrianna Oster Gozza is a fifth-generation grape grower on her father’s side and a third-generation winemaker on her mother’s side (she is the granddaughter of Kathleen and Bernard Fetzer, who founded Fetzer Vineyards in Mendocino County) and grew up playing in vineyards and on tractors. Despite this history, she first completed an undergraduate degree with a major in Political Science from the University of California, Santa Cruz in 2003, thinking, albeit briefly, of becoming a lawyer. Adrianna then worked on a helicopter crew, rappelling into remote areas, fighting fires, and serving on ski patrols. In addition, she worked a few grape harvests in Mendocino and Lake Counties under the guidance of several of her uncles, who included Dan Fetzer at Jeriko Estate, John Fetzer at Saracina, and Jim Fetzer at Ceago Vinegarden. These experiences fostered an interest in the idea of becoming a winemaker.

To gain formal training in winemaking, she earned an MS from the University of California, Davis, in Viticulture and Enology in 2009. While there, Adrianna worked with Dr. Andrew Waterhouse on investigating the importance of metals in the chemical mechanism of wine oxidation and with Dr. Andrew Walker teaching viticulture and ampelography — a field of botany concerned with identifying and classifying grapevines — to undergraduate students. With her MS degree in hand, she then worked with Bob Bath and Karen MacNeil at the Culinary Institute of America, developing her palate and knowledge of wines from around the world.

Adrianna has now returned to Mendocino County as the winemaker at Oster Wine Cellars in Redwood Valley, the organically farmed winery owned and operated with her husband and family. At Oster Wine Cellars, she collaborates closely with her parents, Ken and Teresa Oster, to craft their small lots of Estate-grown Cabernet Sauvignon. Adrianna is committed to allowing the authentic purity of the fruit sourced from the Redwood Valley appellation. To this end, she encourages native yeast fermentations to develop the complex flavor characteristics that reflect the uniqueness of the appellation.