Technology in Teaching Blog

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Technology in Teaching: Marketing

The following are links/references to research and other material focused on using technology in Marketing.  This is a wiki page, feel free to add/correct material as you see fit.


 

Technology in Teaching: Management

The following are links/references to research and other material focused on using technology in Management.  This is a wiki page, feel free to add/correct material as you see fit.


Title:  Technology Use in the Classroom: Preferences of Management Faculty Members
Authors:  Peluchette, Joy V. and Rust, Kathleen A.
Source:  Journal of Education for Business; Mar/Apr2005, Vol. 80 Issue 4, p200-205, 6p, 4 charts

Abstract:
In this study, the authors investigated faculty members' preferences regarding the use of technologies as instructional tools in management courses. They mailed surveys to 500 management faculty members nationwide; 124 were returned with usable data. Respondents indicated that course subject and classroom environmental factors did not affect their use of preferred technologies; however, time constraint was an issue for most of the faculty members, particularly for women. Female faculty members were also more likely than their male colleagues to see their perception of students' learning style as limiting the effective use of their preferred instructional technologies.

Link:  Technology Use in the Classroom: Preferences of Management Faculty Members


Title:  Development of a Computerized In-Basket Exercise for the Classroom: A Sales Management Example

Authors:  Pearson, Michael M.1, Barnes, John W.2, Onken, Marina H.3
Source:  Journal of Marketing Education; Dec2006, Vol. 28 Issue 3, p227-236, 10p

Abstract:
This article follows the development of a sales management in-basket exercise for use in the classroom. The authors have computerized the exercise and added features to allow for additional and more quantitative input from the students. The exercise has evolved and been tested in numerous classroom situations. The computerized in-basket exercise is shown to provide significant benefits over regular in-baskets when measured against the objectives of the exercise. These benefits include quantitative, immediate, and consistent feedback to students as well as spirited discussions in the classroom as to the role and actions of sales managers.

Link:  Development of a Computerized In-Basket Exercise for the Classroom: A Sales Management Example


 

Technology in Teaching: Information Systems

The following are links/references to research and other material focused on using technology in Information Systems.  This is a wiki page, feel free to add/correct material as you see fit.


Title:  Using Multimedia Instructional Materials in MIS Classrooms: A Tutorial
Authors:  Bradley, Randy V.; Mbarika, Victor W. A.; Sankar, Chetan S.; Raju, P. K.; Kaba, Bangaly
Source:  Communications of AIS; 2007, Vol. 2007 Issue 20, p260-281, 22p

Abstract:
Instructors typically communicate technical concepts to information systems (IS) students via lectures and textbooks. In some cases, instructors supplement this traditional approach with written case studies and projects. In this tutorial, we present a non-traditional approach that could be used to communicate technical, as well as non-technical, concepts to IS students -- use of multimedia instructional materials. This article also provides practical advice on how to adapt and implement pedagogy that includes multimedia instructional materials in MIS classrooms. The instructional materials include multimedia case studies that communicate concepts such as choosing appropriate operating systems for specific purposes; understanding Internet and satellite technologies; and decision support and expert systems used to solve real-world problems. The purpose of this article is to present a step-by-step tutorial on using multimedia instructional materials in a typical IS class.

Link:  Using Multimedia Instructional Materials in MIS Classrooms: A Tutorial


Title:  Teaching with Enterprise Systems
Authors: Strong, Diane M.; Fedorowicz, Jane; Sager, James; Stewart, Glenn; Watson, Ed
Source:  Communications of AIS; 2006, Vol. 2006 Issue 17, p2-49, 48p

Abstract:
With the wide-spread adoption of Enterprise Systems (ES), such as SAP, Oracle, and Peoplesoft, in medium and large-sized organizations, there is increasing demand for students who know how to work with such systems. While the demand for ES developers and integrators has declined, the demand for employees that can help companies achieve benefits from these systems continues to grow. Such employees need skills in decision-making and process design in an integrated, data-rich environment enabled by an ES. This paper provides advice about teaching with enterprise systems at the undergraduate and graduate levels within the IS curriculum and across management and engineering curricula. This advice is provided by five professors from five different schools, California State University at Chico, Louisiana State University, Queensland University of Technology, Bentley College, and Worcester Polytechnic Institute that together have many years of experience in teaching with SAP or with the Oracle e-business suite. This paper includes a summary of the experiences at each of these schools, advice based on questions from the audience at an AMCIS 2005 panel, and references to resources that may be helpful to those considering, or already engaged in, teaching with enterprise systems.

Link:  Teaching with Enterprise Systems


Title: Enterprise Resource Planning Software in the Human Resource Classroom
Authors:  Bedell, Michael D; Floyd, Barry D; Nicols, Kay McGlashan; Ellis, Rebecca
Source: Journal of Management Education; Feb2007, Vol. 31 Issue 1, p43-63, 21p

Abstract:
The relatively recent development of comprehensive human resource information systems (HRIS) software has led to a large demand for technologically literate human resource (HR) professionals. For the college student who is about to begin the search for thatfirstpostcollege job, the need to develop technology literacy is even more necessary. To meet this technology need, many business schools have started to think about or have begun to incorporate more advanced technology such as enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems into their curriculum. This article describes the efforts of faculty from two university business schools that incorporated the HRIS module of an ERP system into their HR management courses. In both cases, HRIS was used to illustrate examples of HR processes, measurement, best practices, and planning. Outcomes and lessons learned from the past 2.5 years are also described.

Link:  Enterprise Resource Planning Software in the Human Resource Classroom


 

Technology in Teaching: Finance

The following are links/references to research and other material focused on using technology in Finance.  This is a wiki page, feel free to add/correct material as you see fit.


Title:  Student Perceptions of Online Homework in Introductory Finance Courses
Authors:  Smolira, Joseph C.
Source:  Journal of Education for Business; Nov/Dec2008, Vol. 84 Issue 2, p90-95, 6p, 1 chart

Abstract:
The author examined student perceptions concerning online homework assignments in an introductory finance class. In general, students felt that online homework was preferable to traditional homework assignments that are turned in to the instructor. In addition, students reported that the homework assignments increased their understanding of the material and the time they spent in preparing for the class. Overall, graduate students reported a higher level of satisfaction than did undergraduates.

Link:  Student Perceptions of Online Homework in Introductory Finance Courses


 

Technology in Teaching: Economics

The following are links/references to research and other material focused on using technology in Economics.  This is a wiki page, feel free to add/correct material as you see fit.


Title:  Teaching with Technology: May You Live in Interesting Times
Authors:  Goffe, William L. and Sosin, Kim
Source:  Journal of Economic Education; Summer2005, Vol. 36 Issue 3, p278-291, 14p

Abstract:
During the past 10 years, teaching with computer technology, such as e-mail and the Web, has become customary throughout undergraduate economic education. The authors review the literature on the implications for student learning, present specific educational activities that use a number of different computer technologies, and discuss growing problems, such as "cyber-plagiarism," along with suggesting potential solutions. The future of using technology for teaching economics will be the continuation of recent trends: increased portability in the access to instruction and increased opportunities for interaction, including students' interaction with the material and with the instructor and other students.

Link:  Teaching with Technology: May You Live in Interesting Times


 

Resources Wiki

This is the wiki section of the Technology in Teaching site.  This page, and the pages listed below, can each be edited by users of the site. 

To edit, click on the Edit button above, then enter content in the editing window that appears.  You can add links using the chain icon.

Technology in Teaching: General (non-field-specific)

The following are links/references to research and other material focused on using technology in business and applicable to many fields of study.  This is a wiki page — feel free to add/correct material as you see fit.


Title:  Teaching the Virtual Generation
Find this article at the SCU Library
Authors:  Proserpio, Luigi and Gioia, Dennis A.
Source:  Academy of Management Learning & Education; Mar2007, Vol. 6 Issue 1, p69-80, 12p, 2 charts, 1 diagram

Abstract:
Using Gioia and Brass' 1986 article, "Teaching the TV Generation," as a point of departure for considering our current instructional environment, we focus on a relatively recent development that once again has implications for our teaching pedagogies: that we are, in fact, no longer teaching a verbal, nor even just a visual, but now a virtual generation of students. Technological and social changes in the wider environment can have major implications for teaching and learning pedagogies-i.e., optimal teaching and learning occur when teaching styles align with learning styles. For that reason, we consider some key learning principles in light of the learning styles of our current generation of students, who are quite facile with virtual technologies. We argue that the effective use of some electronic learning tools can provide useful and engaging means for their education by addressing this generation's preferences for virtual media while also enabling student-directed interactivity (via online searches, games, simulations, etc.). We first articulate the conceptual grounds for arguing that there has been another shift in the teaching and learning environment we now face-which implies some necessary adaptation of traditional learning principles. We then discuss: (a) some technologies and applications (mainly Internet-based tools and videogames) that can facilitate the convergence between virtual generation (V-Gen) preferences and classroom interactions; (b) some guidelines for using these technologies to fulfil these learning principles and; (c) some pitfalls that can occur and how to avoid them.


Title:  Assessing a Hybrid Format
Find this article at the SCU Library

Authors:  Katz, Susan M.
Source:  Journal of Business & Technical Communication; Jan2008, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p92-110, 19p, 5 charts

Abstract:
As college instructors endeavor to integrate technology into their classrooms, the crucial question is, "How does this integration affect learning?" This article reports an assessment of a series of online modules the author designed and piloted for a business communication course that she presented in a hybrid format (a combination of computer classroom sessions and independent online work). The modules allowed the author to use classroom time for observation of and individualized attention to the composing process. Although anecdotal evidence suggested that this system was highly effective, other assessment tools provided varying results. An anonymous survey of the students who took this course confirmed that the modules were effective in teaching important concepts; however, a blind review of student work produced mixed results.


Title:  Continuous Improvement Through Teaching Innovations: A Requirement for Today's Learners
Find this article at the SCU Library

Authors:  Matulich, Erika1 Papp, Raymond Haytko, Diana
Source:  Marketing Education Review; Spring2008, Vol. 18 Issue 1, p1-7, 7p, 3 charts, 1 diagram

Abstract:
Teaching methods that have been considered "tried and true" are no longer working with today's active learners. Instructors of marketing, or indeed any field, must heed the call for continuous improvement and constant innovations in order to engage today's students. This paper examines the learning needs of the "digital millennial" or "NetGen" learner and reviews possible teaching innovations that can best address those needs.


Title:  Moving Beyond Adoption: Exploring the Determinants of Student Intention to Use Technology
Find this article at the SCU Library

Authors: Robinson, Jr., Leroy
Source: Marketing Education Review; Summer2006, Vol. 16 Issue 2, p79-88, 10p

Abstract:
This study utilizes current work in the information technology literature to investigate the determinants of intention to use technology by students. The study provides an empirical examination of a modified conceptualization of the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology. Student attitude toward technology and intention to use technology is directly impacted by performance expectancy, effort expectancy, and social influence. The findings provide some insight to university administrators and faculty considering integrating technology tools both inside and outside of the classroom.


Title:  New Technology Meets an Old Teaching Challenge: Using Digital Video Recordings, Annotation Software, and Deliberate Practice Techniques to Improve Student Negotiation Skills
Find this article at the SCU Library
Authors:  Williams, Gerald R.; Farmer, Larry C.; Manwaring, Melissa
Source:  Negotiation Journal; Jan2008, Vol. 24 Issue 1, p71-87, 17p

Abstract: 
There is a world of difference between teaching negotiation theory, which pertains to conceptual understanding, and teaching negotiation skills, which pertain to actual behavior in real-world situations. The principle of reflective practice is widely used for theoretical instruction. Deliberate practice, however, is a more powerful model for skills training. Cognitive scientists have discovered that subjects will learn skills best when they perform well-defined tasks at appropriate levels of difficulty, and when they are given immediate feedback, an opportunity to correct their errors, and an opportunity to practice until the tasks become routine. To satisfy the deliberate practice conditions for large graduate-level negotiation courses (some as large as seventy students), students were assigned to use webcams with their laptop computers to video record their negotiation exercises. Before each exercise, students were assigned to prepare for and to concentrate on performing two or three well-defined tasks. Students reviewed these recordings and commented on their performances in a journal before uploading the videos and journals to an assigned network folder. The instructor and teaching assistants then reviewed the journals and specified portions of the videos and provided individual written feedback to the students. The instructors found that student negotiating skills have improved significantly using this new system. In comparison with earlier semesters, students also felt they were involved in a more intense and personal learning experience. A majority of students reported they intend to apply the principles of deliberate practice in their professional lives after graduation. The authors have found this method continues to challenge their ability to identify and describe the skills used by expert negotiators. As an addition to this new methodology, two of the authors have spearheaded the development of video annotation software, known as “MediaNotes...


Title:  Using Mobile Phone Messaging as a Response Medium in Classroom Experiments
Find this article at the SCU Library

Authors:  Cheung, Stephen L.
Source:  Journal of Economic Education; Winter2008, Vol. 39 Issue 1, p51-67, 17p, 1 diagram, 6 graphs

Abstract:
A major challenge in conducting classroom experiments for larger classes is the complexity of assembling responses and reporting feedback to students. The author demonstrates how mobile phone text messaging can be used to overcome the limitations of pencil-and-paper experiments without incurring the costs of full computerization. Students submit responses as text messages, which are down-loaded into a spreadsheet for automated analysis and by return messaging. The author presents examples of experiments that have been conducted successfully using text messaging as the response medium. These can be run in any room from which the instructor can access the internet and are designed to economize on both class time and effort of the instructor.


Title:  The Role of Information Technology in Technology-Mediated Learning: A Review of the Past for the Future
Find this article at the SCU Library

Author:  Zeying Wan; Yulin Fang; Derrick J. Neufeld
Source: Journal of Information Systems Education 18 no2 183-92 Summ 2007

Abstract:
Technology-mediated learning refers to an environment in which the learner's interactions with learning materials, peers, and/or instructors are mediated through information technologies (Alavi and Leidner, 2001). The objective of this paper is to review current research on technology-mediated learning using a theoretical framework derived from the existing literature. The framework presents three dimensions (primary participant, instructional design, and information technology) that influence students' psychological learning processes, and eventually lead to different learning outcomes. The literature review reveals that certain relationships identified by this framework have received significant attention (e.g., the influence of a technology feature on learning outcomes), while others have been ignored (e.g., the influence of IT on psychological processes). Research questions that can help advance our understanding of technology-mediated learning are discussed. Reprinted by permission of the publisher.


Title: Technology Integration into the Teaching-Learning Process by Business Education Teachers
Find this article at the SCU Library

Author: Redmann, Donna H.; Kotrlik, Joe W.
Source: Delta Pi Epsilon Journal v. 46 no. 2 (Spring/Summer 2004) p. 76-91

Abstract:
This study addressed the factors that explain the integration of technology into the teaching-learning process in Louisiana's secondary business education programs. Four variables explain some of the variance in teachers' integration of technology in instruction. These variables are perceived teaching effectiveness, perceived barriers to integrating technology, students having e-mail accounts, and the availability of selected technology. Business teachers are experiencing a moderate level of technology anxiety and have adopted technology in their instruction, but have not integrated technology at the highest level. Reprinted by permission of the publisher.


Research report: The Becta Review 2006
Link to the full report

Published: 28 April 2006
Publication ID: BEC1-15421
Number of pages in publication: 72

The Becta Review presents findings from recent large-scale surveys and research studies with the aim of assessing the progress of ICT in education at a national level. It identifies key challenges to address in making further progress.


 

Technology in Teaching: General (non-field-specific)

The following are links/references to research and other material focused on using technology in business and applicable to many fields of study.  This is a wiki page — feel free to add/correct material as you see fit.


Title:  Teaching the Virtual Generation
Find this article at the SCU Library
Authors:  Proserpio, Luigi and Gioia, Dennis A.
Source:  Academy of Management Learning & Education; Mar2007, Vol. 6 Issue 1, p69-80, 12p, 2 charts, 1 diagram

Abstract:
Using Gioia and Brass' 1986 article, "Teaching the TV Generation," as a point of departure for considering our current instructional environment, we focus on a relatively recent development that once again has implications for our teaching pedagogies: that we are, in fact, no longer teaching a verbal, nor even just a visual, but now a virtual generation of students. Technological and social changes in the wider environment can have major implications for teaching and learning pedagogies-i.e., optimal teaching and learning occur when teaching styles align with learning styles. For that reason, we consider some key learning principles in light of the learning styles of our current generation of students, who are quite facile with virtual technologies. We argue that the effective use of some electronic learning tools can provide useful and engaging means for their education by addressing this generation's preferences for virtual media while also enabling student-directed interactivity (via online searches, games, simulations, etc.). We first articulate the conceptual grounds for arguing that there has been another shift in the teaching and learning environment we now face-which implies some necessary adaptation of traditional learning principles. We then discuss: (a) some technologies and applications (mainly Internet-based tools and videogames) that can facilitate the convergence between virtual generation (V-Gen) preferences and classroom interactions; (b) some guidelines for using these technologies to fulfil these learning principles and; (c) some pitfalls that can occur and how to avoid them.


Title:  Assessing a Hybrid Format
Find this article at the SCU Library

Authors:  Katz, Susan M.
Source:  Journal of Business & Technical Communication; Jan2008, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p92-110, 19p, 5 charts

Abstract:
As college instructors endeavor to integrate technology into their classrooms, the crucial question is, "How does this integration affect learning?" This article reports an assessment of a series of online modules the author designed and piloted for a business communication course that she presented in a hybrid format (a combination of computer classroom sessions and independent online work). The modules allowed the author to use classroom time for observation of and individualized attention to the composing process. Although anecdotal evidence suggested that this system was highly effective, other assessment tools provided varying results. An anonymous survey of the students who took this course confirmed that the modules were effective in teaching important concepts; however, a blind review of student work produced mixed results.


Title:  Continuous Improvement Through Teaching Innovations: A Requirement for Today's Learners
Find this article at the SCU Library

Authors:  Matulich, Erika1 Papp, Raymond Haytko, Diana
Source:  Marketing Education Review; Spring2008, Vol. 18 Issue 1, p1-7, 7p, 3 charts, 1 diagram

Abstract:
Teaching methods that have been considered "tried and true" are no longer working with today's active learners. Instructors of marketing, or indeed any field, must heed the call for continuous improvement and constant innovations in order to engage today's students. This paper examines the learning needs of the "digital millennial" or "NetGen" learner and reviews possible teaching innovations that can best address those needs.


Title:  Moving Beyond Adoption: Exploring the Determinants of Student Intention to Use Technology
Find this article at the SCU Library

Authors: Robinson, Jr., Leroy
Source: Marketing Education Review; Summer2006, Vol. 16 Issue 2, p79-88, 10p

Abstract:
This study utilizes current work in the information technology literature to investigate the determinants of intention to use technology by students. The study provides an empirical examination of a modified conceptualization of the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology. Student attitude toward technology and intention to use technology is directly impacted by performance expectancy, effort expectancy, and social influence. The findings provide some insight to university administrators and faculty considering integrating technology tools both inside and outside of the classroom.


Title:  New Technology Meets an Old Teaching Challenge: Using Digital Video Recordings, Annotation Software, and Deliberate Practice Techniques to Improve Student Negotiation Skills
Find this article at the SCU Library
Authors:  Williams, Gerald R.; Farmer, Larry C.; Manwaring, Melissa
Source:  Negotiation Journal; Jan2008, Vol. 24 Issue 1, p71-87, 17p

Abstract: 
There is a world of difference between teaching negotiation theory, which pertains to conceptual understanding, and teaching negotiation skills, which pertain to actual behavior in real-world situations. The principle of reflective practice is widely used for theoretical instruction. Deliberate practice, however, is a more powerful model for skills training. Cognitive scientists have discovered that subjects will learn skills best when they perform well-defined tasks at appropriate levels of difficulty, and when they are given immediate feedback, an opportunity to correct their errors, and an opportunity to practice until the tasks become routine. To satisfy the deliberate practice conditions for large graduate-level negotiation courses (some as large as seventy students), students were assigned to use webcams with their laptop computers to video record their negotiation exercises. Before each exercise, students were assigned to prepare for and to concentrate on performing two or three well-defined tasks. Students reviewed these recordings and commented on their performances in a journal before uploading the videos and journals to an assigned network folder. The instructor and teaching assistants then reviewed the journals and specified portions of the videos and provided individual written feedback to the students. The instructors found that student negotiating skills have improved significantly using this new system. In comparison with earlier semesters, students also felt they were involved in a more intense and personal learning experience. A majority of students reported they intend to apply the principles of deliberate practice in their professional lives after graduation. The authors have found this method continues to challenge their ability to identify and describe the skills used by expert negotiators. As an addition to this new methodology, two of the authors have spearheaded the development of video annotation software, known as “MediaNotes...


Title:  Using Mobile Phone Messaging as a Response Medium in Classroom Experiments
Find this article at the SCU Library

Authors:  Cheung, Stephen L.
Source:  Journal of Economic Education; Winter2008, Vol. 39 Issue 1, p51-67, 17p, 1 diagram, 6 graphs

Abstract:
A major challenge in conducting classroom experiments for larger classes is the complexity of assembling responses and reporting feedback to students. The author demonstrates how mobile phone text messaging can be used to overcome the limitations of pencil-and-paper experiments without incurring the costs of full computerization. Students submit responses as text messages, which are down-loaded into a spreadsheet for automated analysis and by return messaging. The author presents examples of experiments that have been conducted successfully using text messaging as the response medium. These can be run in any room from which the instructor can access the internet and are designed to economize on both class time and effort of the instructor.


Title:  The Role of Information Technology in Technology-Mediated Learning: A Review of the Past for the Future
Find this article at the SCU Library

Author:  Zeying Wan; Yulin Fang; Derrick J. Neufeld
Source: Journal of Information Systems Education 18 no2 183-92 Summ 2007

Abstract:
Technology-mediated learning refers to an environment in which the learner's interactions with learning materials, peers, and/or instructors are mediated through information technologies (Alavi and Leidner, 2001). The objective of this paper is to review current research on technology-mediated learning using a theoretical framework derived from the existing literature. The framework presents three dimensions (primary participant, instructional design, and information technology) that influence students' psychological learning processes, and eventually lead to different learning outcomes. The literature review reveals that certain relationships identified by this framework have received significant attention (e.g., the influence of a technology feature on learning outcomes), while others have been ignored (e.g., the influence of IT on psychological processes). Research questions that can help advance our understanding of technology-mediated learning are discussed. Reprinted by permission of the publisher.


Title: Technology Integration into the Teaching-Learning Process by Business Education Teachers
Author: Redmann, Donna H.; Kotrlik, Joe W.
Source: Delta Pi Epsilon Journal v. 46 no. 2 (Spring/Summer 2004) p. 76-91

Abstract:
This study addressed the factors that explain the integration of technology into the teaching-learning process in Louisiana's secondary business education programs. Four variables explain some of the variance in teachers' integration of technology in instruction. These variables are perceived teaching effectiveness, perceived barriers to integrating technology, students having e-mail accounts, and the availability of selected technology. Business teachers are experiencing a moderate level of technology anxiety and have adopted technology in their instruction, but have not integrated technology at the highest level. Reprinted by permission of the publisher.

Link:  Technology Integration into the Teaching-Learning Process by Business Education Teachers


Research report: The Becta Review 2006
Published: 28 April 2006
Publication ID: BEC1-15421
Number of pages in publication: 72

The Becta Review presents findings from recent large-scale surveys and research studies with the aim of assessing the progress of ICT in education at a national level. It identifies key challenges to address in making further progress.

Link:  The Becta Review 2006


 

Technology in Teaching: Operations

The following are links/references to research and other material focused on using technology in Operations.  This is a wiki page, feel free to add/correct material as you see fit.


 

Resources Wiki

This is the wiki section of the Technology in Teaching site.  This page, and the pages listed below, can each be edited by users of the site. 

To edit, click on the Edit button above, then enter connect in the editing window that appears.  You can add links using the chain icon.

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